Engine DIY Guides 

This section lists my DIY guides for engine-related topics, including oil changes, the intake and exhaust systems, and various other items. Click on the image or title for each one to go to that guide.

DISCLAIMER: As always, follow all safety protocols. Don't undertake this task if you aren't comfortable with it and fully understand it. You are ultimately responsible for anything you do. Neither Redpants, LLC or myself is responsible or liable for anything that may occur.


The V8 Vantage’s engine oil should be changed every year, or every 10,000 miles (whichever comes first). All the parts you need are included in my Oil Change Packages, and I recommend using 10w60 Motul engine oil. The oil change package is also included in my 2-Year Service Packages.


The DB9’s engine oil should be changed every year, or every 10,000 miles (whichever comes first). All the parts you need are included in my Oil Change Packages, and I recommend using 0w40 Motul engine oil. The oil change package is also included in my 2-Year Service Packages.


Intake filters should be changed every two years, or 20,000 miles (whichever comes first). If you live in a harsh climate, you may want to change them every year. I sell OEM paper intake filters as well as my own dry or oiled cloth intake filters. For more information about these options, check out my Intake Filters page.

The OEM paper intake filters are included with my 2-Year Service Packages, and Redpants cloth intake filters are included in my Performance 2-Year Service Packages.


The air boxes in an Aston Martin are located beneath the headlights and are accessible by removing the front fender liners. There are a few reasons to remove them, including replacing damaged ones, modifying existing ones, swapping out standard ones for Power Pack air boxes, or removing them with our Air Box Delete Brackets.


Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensors measure the amount of air entering your intake system. If the sensors get too dirty or are damaged, they’ll need to be replaced.


The thermostat in the V8 Vantage has something of a flawed design. The gasket is molded into it and, once the gasket goes bad, the thermostat has to be replaced. The big issue here is that pieces of the gasket can come loose and get lost into your coolant system, never to be seen again.

I recommend replacing the thermostat as preventative maintenance every 5 years or 50k miles (whichever comes first), at the same time as replacing your coolant. I sell Jaguar thermostats, which are direct replacements at a lower price, and recommend getting a new thermostat housing gasket along with it.


The product that started Redpants! There’s a surprisingly large amount of oil that gets into your intake system. The Redpants catch can kit solves that problem.


The factory air-oil separator (AOS) isn’t well-designed. Not only does it fail to prevent oil from getting into your intake system (the Redpants catch can kit fixes that), it can also leak. The leak is due to the AOS being held in place by only a single bolt, which allows oil to get past the o-ring when the o-ring gets a bit old. Replacing the o-ring with a new fixes the leak.


Spark plugs should be replaced every 60,000 miles, or 6 years (whichever comes first). This also happens to be around the same time the coil packs start to go bad. They all have to be removed together, so I recommend replacing your spark plugs and coil packs at the same time.


The Front Engine Accessory Drive (FEAD) belt on the V8 Vantage has been updated a few times, as has the idler assembly pulley that is part of that system. If you have the earlier versions of either part, it may cause a ‘chirp’ sound while cold. Replacing both parts with the most current versions fixes the issue.


I cracked the mount for one of my radiator fans when I slammed my car into a tire wall during a track day. Luckily, replacing the radiator fans is incredibly easy.


This is a very odd problem with a potentially serious effect. The fuel vapor recirculation hose is meant to return fuel vapors to the engine to be burned off, but the hose can split open and suck up liquid fuel. That fuel can then be dumped into the engine, causing it to stall out while you’re driving. This DIY shows how to fix it.


Changing out the factory exhaust manifolds (“headers”) for equal-length headers gives you more power and better engine response. This is a really difficult job, but it can be done if you’ve tackled hard jobs before and have the right tools and enough patience.


One of the most common modifications for the V8 Vantage (and just about any car) is replacing the factory catalytic converters (“cats”) with high-flow cats or cat-delete pipes. Other than a couple tricky bolts, this is a fairly straight-forward job.